Category Archives: Art

Alejo Musich

Working in a contemporary art gallery in New York, I have the opportunity to meet many artists. Each artist is unique, but there is no one quite like Alejo Musich.

Alejo MusichI met Alejo serendipitously at the PINTA NY art fair in November 2013 through my other artist friend, Tomas Rivas. The unassuming, slight, and Argentinian Alejo would become a great friend instantly.

A native Spanish speaker with perfect English grammar and a penchant for idioms and colloquialisms, Alejo has the desire to utilize and stretch language to the maximum. Each thought is exquisitely executed through syntax, intonation and conciseness.

When I asked him about the impending ArteBA fair in Buenos Aires in which his paintings would be shown by Miau Miau Gallery, this was his response:

right now they may be in another galaxy, setting everything up and with their minds flirting with breakdown. today’s the pre opening and it has been raining mad for two days now. anticlimatic. I live something like ten blocks away from the pavilion where all takes place, and in this rain I won’t go walking. imagine if to attend you have to leave your house in a leisure set of mind, you are a vip and you can just stay home with netflix, vogue italia, your afghan dogs, and just wait, maybe for tomorrow or next year. “We’ll always have Basel”, and ask someone for another coffee, and another someone to take de dogs about for a pipi.

In addition to the his language skills, Alejo is a very talented painter. He paints scenes from nature, some informed from Russian fairy tales, and others from his imagination. His brush strokes are textural and intentional. His color palette is deep with accents of pastel and neon integrating beautifully into the canvas. His paintings are full of mystery and tension.

Alejo Musich Sin Titulo (Zorro I)

Alejo Musich All your glory

Alejo Musich Melville, or, The Whale

Alejo Musich Sin título (Bosque 2014)

All in all, I am happy to be able to call this talented and spirited artist my friend.

Alejo Musich Maria Kucinski

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Reject Dance Theatre presents The Territory Suites

My dream of becoming a professional dancer has finally come true with the opportunity to collaborate with Reject Dance Theatre. My dear friend, Rebecca Hite Teicheira (here’s a post from her MFA Thesis), invited me to be a part of RDT’s first evening length piece, The Territory Suites presented at Triskelion Arts in Brooklyn, NY.

Reject Dance Theatre Rebecca Hite Teicheira Maria KucinskiAlong with the directors, Rebecca Hite Teicheira, Stephen Ursprung and Stephanie Simpson, I worked with Bridget Cronin, Jermaine Ellis, Cara Hoover, Rachel Pritzlaff, and Larissa Ursprung to explore the idea of territory through three distinct perspectives.

Reject Dance Theatre The Territory SuitesIt was amazing to get back to work in the studio – conditioning my body, learning unique choreography and creating new movement. I forgot just how much I enjoyed dancing and the process of creating dance.

Reject Dance Theatre The Territory SuitesWorking through the many details – from the concrete ones like choreography, spacing, timing, costuming, hair, makeup, and lighting, to the more intangible ones such as presence, interaction, and intention – re-energized me artistically. My favorite part of the process was examining the intention of every step, every movement in the piece, ensuring that there was a reason behind every action.

Reject Dance Theatre The Territory SuitesThrough those intentions, we explored the notion of “territory,” investigating themes of gender identity, human relationships, and animal interactions through choreographic means of collaboration, partnering, and synchronization. The artistic vision of the three choreographers was distinct but centralized along this universal theme.

Reject Dance Theatre The Territory SuitesIt was truly an honor to be a part of something very special for Reject Dance Theatre and its collaborators. I found that I forgot how much I enjoyed performing and am grateful for the opportunity to be on stage once again.

Reject Dance Theatre The Territory Suites Rachel Pritzlaff Rebecca Hite TeicheiraAll in all, it was an inspiring experience to work with so many talented artists.

Reject Dance Theatre The Territory Suites Rachel Pritzlaff

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LADY GAGA artRAVE

Lady Gaga ArtraveIn a very last minute, last ditch opportunity, I found myself sailing for Lady Gaga’s artRAVE concert extravaganza to celebrate her album, ARTPOP at the Brooklyn Navy Yards.

Lady Gaga Jeff Koons Maria KucinskiArtist Jeff Koons co-hosted the event, showing off his larger-than-life sculpture of Lady Gaga – a breathtaking and hypnotizing piece of art. You can sense Lady Gaga’s aura through the work.

Lady Gaga ArtravePrior to the concert, there were extremely polished video projections of her new music video, her studies at the Marina Abramovic Insitute, and a 3-channel video projection of herself being tortured. Although difficult to watch, especially surrounded by the merriest “Little Monsters” in the world, it was very well done.

Art world royalty was also in attendance including Yoko Ono, Simon de Pury, and Klaus Biesenbach.

7 IMAG3961What I came away with from the event is that Lady Gaga is a true artist. She has surrounded herself with great artists and she has learned their craft. The most noticeable influence is that of Marina Abramovic, with whom Lady Gaga has been studying. There is a new focus, a new concentration to her. I also saw references to the Fluxus Movement and to Robert Wilson with his iconic gestures. She is wholly devoting herself to her craft, to her art, exposing her body and giving herself to the audience.

Lady Gaga ArtraveBut aside from the flawlessness of the evening, there was also an overall sense of peace and happiness and acceptance. Strangers were telling me that I was beautiful and I made friends with a few people around me.

How could you not be happy in Gaga’s world? And it is her world. She sits atop a throne, legs apart, commanding attention.

Jeff Koons Lady Gaga ArtraveAfter the concert ended, I shook Jeff Koons’ hand and told him that the sculpture was stunning.

And then I locked eyes with Darren Criss. A beautiful end to my memorable night.

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Come, and Back Again by David Dorfman Dance at BAM

David Dorfman Dance’s Come, and Back Again is a beautiful showcase of reflection through dance and multimedia.

A wall of stuff, fossilized in white frames the stage. A band, also in white, sits upstage, playing songs of “poetic rock and roll.” Four dancers and David energize the space with the weighted – but not heavy – and entangling choreography. Real-time projection, text, and the presence of David’s wife and son convey the powerful symbols of clutter, preservation, and what we leave behind.

All in all, the high intensity piece was a touching reminder that there are those moments in life, those emotions that are worth experiencing, worth feeling. But what I enjoyed the most about the piece was David’s ability to tell his story, so beautifully, so poignantly, so joyfully.

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Executing a site-specific “intervention” in New York City

Jennifer Marman Daniel Borins Maria Kucinski Photo: Joe Leavenworth

Final adjustments to Pavilion of the Blind with Jennifer Marman and Daniel Borins. Photo: Joe Leavenworth.

I recently had the amazing opportunity to work with two very talented artists, Jennifer Marman and Daniel Borins on their debut New York exhibition, Pavilion of the Blind on view at the Tierney Gardarin Gallery through October 26th. In addition to working with the artists to prepare and install their stellar exhibition, I was tasked with executing a site-specific intervention.

Tenth Ave and 29th Street ChelseaAmongst all the development going on in West Chelsea and Hudson Yards, there are businesses that continue to operate. The gallery is one of those storefront businesses with demolition and construction affecting daily life. In talks to beautify the block and perhaps subtly notify the passersby of our existence in the outpost that is 29th Street, we decided to do an intervention on the construction hoarding.

Tenth Avenue and 29th StreetWet posters to be wheat pasted proved to be too costly. Next best option? Painting vertical stripes in the style of of Marman + Borins latest works, utilizing the color palette they have developed for the past five years. Daniel and I picked out the exact colors and finish. We thought “Daredevil” red was a suitable choice. There were five colors in total with one vertical stripe to be left blank – a commentary on the site and its existing artwork.

Nick Hugh Schmidt

Malcolm BarrettI hired two fantastic artists, Nick Hugh Schmidt and Malcolm Barrett to execute the stripes. They began at 10th Avenue between 28th and 29th Street and wrapped around the corner of 29th Street towards 11th Avenue. In a couple hours, they had made an unsightly construction site into something worth looking at, something worth noticing.

Nick Hugh Schmidt Malcolm Barret 10th Ave and 29th St

Jennifer Marman Daniel Borins 10th Ave 29th StreetAll in all, I think the piece is a stunning tribute to what a little paint and a sharp aesthetic can add to a city block.Tenth Ave 29th Street

Jennifer Marman Daniel Borins

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In the studio with Melissa Brown

Melissa Brown in her studio

I recently had the opportunity to visit Melissa Brown’s studio. I have known Melissa for a long time through my friend Joe Grillo. I saw her show Paper Fortune at Canada Gallery back in 2009 when everything was doom and gloom and her show reflected that attitude. The woodcuts she presented were critical of wealth and the symbols surrounding it.

Since then, Melissa has found herself painting landscapes, trying to envision a panoramic view in the gallery space – most recently with Palisades at Kansas Gallery and an upcoming show in Connecticut.

Melissa BrownBut what Melissa is most excited about now is a group of paintings that explore the technique of printmaking through painting. With this work, she is also looking at an object and shifting the plane to abstraction. Rocks are her figures that become abstraction and then figure again through the idea of pareidolia – the perception that there is some sort of pattern or meaning where there is none (i.e. seeing a face in the clouds).

Melissa Brown Mirrored RocksShe uses stencils to create the dominant figure in each series of paintings. Melissa blends colors beautifully and creates depth by juxtaposing sharp lines and soft textures, highlighting the paintings with vibrant streaks. It all adds up to a visual image that is interesting and smart and engaging.

Melissa BrownMelissa is also working on a series of stop-motion animations that tie in nicely with the paintings – layered and captivating throughout.

I really enjoyed the way Melissa spoke about her work. She was very much aware of her creative arc. She has certain goals and the mindset and the talent to achieve them.

All in all, I was happy to spend an evening in her studio learning more about her work and I look forward to seeing it progress.

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Critter & Guitari on F.A.T. Gold Public Access at Eyebeam

Critter and Guitari at Eyebeam with Bennett Williamson

Chris Kucinski, Bennett Williamson, and Owen Osborn at Eyebeam.

As part of Eyebeam’s current exhibition, F.A.T. Gold: Five Years of Free Art & Technology curated by Lindsay Howard and on view through April 20th, Critter & Guitari was asked to host a jam session for Public Access organized by Bennett Williamson.

In true Critter & Guitari fashion, Chris Kucinski and Owen Osborn invited their friends Devin Flynn, Ross Goldstein, Raphael Griswold, and even me to collaborate and make some new sounds. (Bennett would have also jammed with us like he did at the Experimental Television Center, but he had to operate the AV equipment.) The hour-long jam incorporated the sounds of the Pocket Piano family (including the first prototype), the Kaleidoloop family, and the Bolsa Bass along with a variety of analog instruments.

Click here to see the full live-streamed video of the jam.

All in all, the jam showed the collaborative and fun nature of the instruments and the cooperative generation in which they were created.

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Welcome to Pine Hill by Keith Miller

Welcome to Pine Hill

After a year of touring and winning countless prizes, including the Grand Jury Prize at the Slamdance Film Festival, I saw Welcome to Pine Hill, written, directed and edited by my former professor, Keith Miller.

If there was one thing I learned from Miller, it was to go with what challenges arose and work through them, to explore new territory. This film, in its creation and its narrative, does exactly that. Miller first met the star of the film, Shanon Harper, through a chance encounter, a scene that opens the film. We then follow Harper through his reformed life as an insurance claims adjuster and his diagnosis of cancer.

Throughout the film there is a beauty in the silence, in what is unsaid, much akin to a Kelly Reichardt film. Miller’s outlook, however, is that of empathy and understanding. He sees Harper as someone dealing with the circumstances, navigating heightened realities, and confronting his death. Harper eventually finds peace and the viewer is left to stew in his mortality.

All in all, from a chance encounter to a full-length film, Miller explores the many paths in life and how we should set aside our differences.

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Meryl Tankard: The Oracle at the Skirball Center for the Performing Arts

Meryl Tankard’s The Oracle starring Paul White is a mastery in the limits of the human form and its relation to the mind.

With its point of departure as Vaslav Nijinsky’s The Rite of Spring with the score by Igor Stravinsky, Australian native, Meryl Tankard presents a multimedia and solo performance that is wildly expressive yet contained. The star, Paul White, is in control of his every movement even as he expresses desire, excitement, confusion, and despair.

The opening reveals a kaleidoscopic view at our protagonist, each angle of the body morphing into another, creating abstract forms and recognizable shapes. Then we find White center stage, repeating the undulating choreography of Nijinsky in only white briefs. He continues through many phases of choreography, with his costuming changing, with interaction to the projection behind him, with interplay with light, and finally in the nude with a white powder trailing him.

White’s body is incredible. Unlike any other male dancer I have seen before. But more than that, he has the ability to flow seamlessly through the choreography, hitting the deepest poses and maneuvering to the next with fluidity. One does not realize how challenging the movement is.

And this must be attributed to Tankard, the former ballerina and Pina Bausch Tanztheater Wuppertal dancer. Her choreography and artistic vision weave through time periods, physical limitations, and man’s need to satisfy desire.

All in all, I found myself in admiration of this piece for honoring an historic piece of dance and advancing the the medium through presentation, choreography and dancing.

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Post-Sandy Reopening of the South Street Seaport Museum and Bowne & Co.

Bowne and Co Custom Print ShopLast night, I attended the reopening of the South Street Seaport Museum and the print shop, Bowne & Co. Founded in 1775, Bowne & Co. is New York’s oldest existing business under the same name and thankfully, it survived Sandy.

Bowne and Co Sandy Recovery

As I mentioned in my post about Sandy, my friend Ali Osborn is the Resident Printer at Bowne & Co. located in the South Street Seaport. The print shop filled with antique equipment was inundated with two feet of salt water. This would have been enough to damage any business, but with the thousands of historic wooden and metal type and the wooden drawers housing prints, it was a disaster.

Bowne and Co Sandy Recovery

So Ali, with the help of Assistant Printer Gideon Finck and other members of the museum staff, and volunteers, worked to recover and restore as much as they could. They had to go through more than 100 drawers, washing and drying off each individual piece of type. Then, they had to hope that the wood wouldn’t bow – otherwise, the type would be useless for printing.

Unknown Roman

Almost three months after the storm, the print shop has reopened. Returning to its normal business of custom letterpress printing orders and creating original, hand-printed cards, posters, and coasters for sale in their shop and at the South Street Seaport Museum.

Bowne and Co

It was wonderful to see the shop restored with new prints lining the walls. Many people came out to show their support of the historic company and even Mayor Mike Bloomberg stopped by, reiterating the importance of this institution in New York City.

Ali Osborn at Bowne and Co

Among the various prints on display, there were posters that said “New York,” a postcard of an art deco the New York City skyline, and a note card with a ship in a bottle. Bias aside, my favorite piece was Ali’s There, There. With delicate humor and smart sensibility, the large text sits atop various maps in this edition.

All in all, it is great to see an organization dedicated to preserving the history of this technology and furthering it as an art form.

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