Clay Time with Nicholas Newcomb

The talented ceramicist, Nicholas Newcomb, recently invited me and a group of friends to his pottery studio in Brooklyn to learn the fine art of ceramics. Through Nic’s teaching, I came away from our “clay time” session with a deeper appreciation of ceramics as well as great admiration for Nic’s work.

Nicholas NewcombNic studied fine art at Skidmore College in Saratoga Springs, where he apprenticed with renowned ceramics artist Toshiko Takaezu. He has also worked with highly acclaimed artists, sculptors, and designers such as Leslie Ferst, Regis Brodie, William Hardy, and Christopher Spitzmiller. Now in his eponymous shop, Nic creates a variety of works including minimal, nature-inspired dinnerware, drinkware, serveware, and cachepots; organic lamps and air pod plant holders; and free-form sculptures. Nic’s collections mimic his laid back vibes and his thoughtfulness.

Nicholas NewcombNic’s also a great teacher. In addition to teaching the techniques involved in ceramics, he taught the philosophies behind it too. I learned to let the imperfections go and to embrace the mistakes. Plus we had a great time making our own little objects whether they were functional or purely aesthetic.

Nic Newcomb Clay Time

All in all, I thank Nic for sharing his knowledge and insight. I am excited to continue following Nic’s career.

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My day in Wallace, Idaho

Road TripThis summer, I spent a week traveling across the northwestern part of the United States. My brother, his fiancée, and I rented a car and drove from Jackson Hole, Wyoming to Occidental, California, stopping along the way in Grand Teton National Park; Yellowstone National Park; Butte, Montana; Anaconda, Montana; Wallace, Idaho; Coeur d’Alene, Idaho; Walla Walla, Washington; and Portland, Oregon. Of all those amazing and distinctly unique places, our favorite was Wallace, Idaho.

IdahoOur journey in Wallace began with a bike tour on the Hiawatha Trail. We crossed the border from Montana into Idaho, picked up our mountain bikes, hitched them to the back of our Volkswagon, Passat, and then drove back over the border into Montana. We parked at the entrance to the trail, tested our brakes, flashlights, and then entered into the tunnel. It was absolutely pitch black, cold, damp, windy, and with no sign of when it would end. Pedaling slowly and clutching the handlebars with my frozen hands, I finally emerged from the tunnel two miles later, grateful to see the sun.

Hiawatha TrailThe trail then wound through the mountains on the states’ border. We rode over train trellises and through smaller tunnels, making our way 13 miles to the valley floor. After the fear of being forever lost in a tunnel or sliding down the side of the mountain wore off, I felt the exhilaration of riding through this historic trail. After an hour and a half of riding, a shuttle bus brought us back to the car and we once again crossed back into Idaho to find the town of Wallace.

Wallace IdahoThe tiny Wallace used to be a major silver mining hub located in what is known as “Silver Valley.” Now it is mostly a tourist destination.

Lola Red Light GarageWe arrived in time for happy hour, grabbing a flight of beers at Wallace Brewing. Then we had dinner at Red Light Garage – a restaurant with a unique decor and the perfect amount of charm. Lola served us an amazing meal topped off with a huckleberry shake.

Wallace Brewing CompanyLola recommended that we then go to the Wallace Brewing Company on the “outskirts” of town, just on the other side of the highway which passed overhead. We headed over there and grabbed another flight of beers as well as some huckleberry lemonade. The owner of the brewery invited us to take a look at the tanks in the back. Everyone in Wallace was so friendly.

Metals BarWe ended the night at Metals Bar where we encountered the heart of America and were presented with the most moving rendition of God Bless the USA sung on the karaoke stage in the back.

The next morning, crunched for time, we learned about three different industries in the span of two hours.

Wallace Train StationThe first business was the railroad. We visited the railroad museum located near the highway overpass. The station had to be moved 200 feet to make room for the highway. Wallace, once a center of industry and prosperity, depended on the railroad to transport goods. It was also a hub for businessmen. The main claim to fame of Wallace (aside from being featured in Dante’s Peak) is that President Teddy Roosevelt visited for one day in 1903. He came by railroad.

Bordello Museum Wallace IdahoThe second enterprise was prostitution. There was a bordello that successfully operated until 1987 when the madame got word that the state police were coming to investigate. The women fled and never returned, leaving the building in exactly the state they had left it. It remains in that state today.

Maria Kucinski Silver MineThe third industry was mining. We hopped on a trolley that took us to a nearby silver mine located in the mountains. A former miner took us into the mine showing us the quartz veins that indicate silver, the tools, the methods, and the way of life for a miner. We learned that the science of mining and the physical demands were not for the weak of heart or mind.

Wallace accordion paradeIn addition to these planned excursions, we also happened upon an accordion parade. It was the icing on the cake of our stay in Wallace.

Wallace IdahoAll in all, Wallace was a beautiful and quaint town full of history and culture. I definitely recommend visiting. Tell them Lola sent you.

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Alejo Musich

Working in a contemporary art gallery in New York, I have the opportunity to meet many artists. Each artist is unique, but there is no one quite like Alejo Musich.

Alejo MusichI met Alejo serendipitously at the PINTA NY art fair in November 2013 through my other artist friend, Tomas Rivas. The unassuming, slight, and Argentinian Alejo would become a great friend instantly.

A native Spanish speaker with perfect English grammar and a penchant for idioms and colloquialisms, Alejo has the desire to utilize and stretch language to the maximum. Each thought is exquisitely executed through syntax, intonation and conciseness.

When I asked him about the impending ArteBA fair in Buenos Aires in which his paintings would be shown by Miau Miau Gallery, this was his response:

right now they may be in another galaxy, setting everything up and with their minds flirting with breakdown. today’s the pre opening and it has been raining mad for two days now. anticlimatic. I live something like ten blocks away from the pavilion where all takes place, and in this rain I won’t go walking. imagine if to attend you have to leave your house in a leisure set of mind, you are a vip and you can just stay home with netflix, vogue italia, your afghan dogs, and just wait, maybe for tomorrow or next year. “We’ll always have Basel”, and ask someone for another coffee, and another someone to take de dogs about for a pipi.

In addition to the his language skills, Alejo is a very talented painter. He paints scenes from nature, some informed from Russian fairy tales, and others from his imagination. His brush strokes are textural and intentional. His color palette is deep with accents of pastel and neon integrating beautifully into the canvas. His paintings are full of mystery and tension.

Alejo Musich Sin Titulo (Zorro I)

Alejo Musich All your glory

Alejo Musich Melville, or, The Whale

Alejo Musich Sin título (Bosque 2014)

All in all, I am happy to be able to call this talented and spirited artist my friend.

Alejo Musich Maria Kucinski

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Reject Dance Theatre presents The Territory Suites

My dream of becoming a professional dancer has finally come true with the opportunity to collaborate with Reject Dance Theatre. My dear friend, Rebecca Hite Teicheira (here’s a post from her MFA Thesis), invited me to be a part of RDT’s first evening length piece, The Territory Suites presented at Triskelion Arts in Brooklyn, NY.

Reject Dance Theatre Rebecca Hite Teicheira Maria KucinskiAlong with the directors, Rebecca Hite Teicheira, Stephen Ursprung and Stephanie Simpson, I worked with Bridget Cronin, Jermaine Ellis, Cara Hoover, Rachel Pritzlaff, and Larissa Ursprung to explore the idea of territory through three distinct perspectives.

Reject Dance Theatre The Territory SuitesIt was amazing to get back to work in the studio – conditioning my body, learning unique choreography and creating new movement. I forgot just how much I enjoyed dancing and the process of creating dance.

Reject Dance Theatre The Territory SuitesWorking through the many details – from the concrete ones like choreography, spacing, timing, costuming, hair, makeup, and lighting, to the more intangible ones such as presence, interaction, and intention – re-energized me artistically. My favorite part of the process was examining the intention of every step, every movement in the piece, ensuring that there was a reason behind every action.

Reject Dance Theatre The Territory SuitesThrough those intentions, we explored the notion of “territory,” investigating themes of gender identity, human relationships, and animal interactions through choreographic means of collaboration, partnering, and synchronization. The artistic vision of the three choreographers was distinct but centralized along this universal theme.

Reject Dance Theatre The Territory SuitesIt was truly an honor to be a part of something very special for Reject Dance Theatre and its collaborators. I found that I forgot how much I enjoyed performing and am grateful for the opportunity to be on stage once again.

Reject Dance Theatre The Territory Suites Rachel Pritzlaff Rebecca Hite TeicheiraAll in all, it was an inspiring experience to work with so many talented artists.

Reject Dance Theatre The Territory Suites Rachel Pritzlaff

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Lady Gaga ArtraveIn a very last minute, last ditch opportunity, I found myself sailing for Lady Gaga’s artRAVE concert extravaganza to celebrate her album, ARTPOP at the Brooklyn Navy Yards.

Lady Gaga Jeff Koons Maria KucinskiArtist Jeff Koons co-hosted the event, showing off his larger-than-life sculpture of Lady Gaga – a breathtaking and hypnotizing piece of art. You can sense Lady Gaga’s aura through the work.

Lady Gaga ArtravePrior to the concert, there were extremely polished video projections of her new music video, her studies at the Marina Abramovic Insitute, and a 3-channel video projection of herself being tortured. Although difficult to watch, especially surrounded by the merriest “Little Monsters” in the world, it was very well done.

Art world royalty was also in attendance including Yoko Ono, Simon de Pury, and Klaus Biesenbach.

7 IMAG3961What I came away with from the event is that Lady Gaga is a true artist. She has surrounded herself with great artists and she has learned their craft. The most noticeable influence is that of Marina Abramovic, with whom Lady Gaga has been studying. There is a new focus, a new concentration to her. I also saw references to the Fluxus Movement and to Robert Wilson with his iconic gestures. She is wholly devoting herself to her craft, to her art, exposing her body and giving herself to the audience.

Lady Gaga ArtraveBut aside from the flawlessness of the evening, there was also an overall sense of peace and happiness and acceptance. Strangers were telling me that I was beautiful and I made friends with a few people around me.

How could you not be happy in Gaga’s world? And it is her world. She sits atop a throne, legs apart, commanding attention.

Jeff Koons Lady Gaga ArtraveAfter the concert ended, I shook Jeff Koons’ hand and told him that the sculpture was stunning.

And then I locked eyes with Darren Criss. A beautiful end to my memorable night.

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Come, and Back Again by David Dorfman Dance at BAM

David Dorfman Dance’s Come, and Back Again is a beautiful showcase of reflection through dance and multimedia.

A wall of stuff, fossilized in white frames the stage. A band, also in white, sits upstage, playing songs of “poetic rock and roll.” Four dancers and David energize the space with the weighted – but not heavy – and entangling choreography. Real-time projection, text, and the presence of David’s wife and son convey the powerful symbols of clutter, preservation, and what we leave behind.

All in all, the high intensity piece was a touching reminder that there are those moments in life, those emotions that are worth experiencing, worth feeling. But what I enjoyed the most about the piece was David’s ability to tell his story, so beautifully, so poignantly, so joyfully.

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My escape to the American Southwest

I flew out to Arizona for my first time and I fell in love.

Route 8The purpose of my trip was to see Alois Kronschlaeger’s awe-inspiring Untitled (Basin and Range) at MOCA Tucson. His installation, his largest and most ambitious to-date, was stunning. It was over a year in the making, took seven weeks to install with a crew of people, and one night to celebrate his accomplishment.

Alois Kronschlaeger Maria KucinskiI also ventured into the desert. I took in the landscape and the culture.

Tucson Arizona

Tucson ArizonaAt dawn, I bid adieu to Tucson and headed to Yuma, Arizona in a red convertible Chevy Camaro. I got the grand tour of Yuma by the city’s own spokesperson, seeing the Colorado River and the Ocean to Ocean Highway.

Martha GuzmanI hopped back in my Camaro and continued my journey to San Diego. I traveled through the desert, the sand dunes, the turbines, the mountains, and finally through paradise.

View from the CamaroI drove over 400 miles to the coast, basking in the sun upon my arrival.

Maria Kucinski Red Chevrolet Camaro Convertible 2013I ate Mexican food while talking aviation with my old pal and Marine pilot.

Brad PanasitiThe next day, I traded in the Camaro for a new set of wheels, a beautiful bicycle with red rims. I rode all along Mission Beach, envisioning my life in this paradise.

Maria Kucinski Bicycle in Paradise


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